Daily Wine News: Wild Blueberry Wine

Posted by | Posted in Wine News | Posted on 08-16-2019

Bluet, a sparkling wine made from wild blueberries. (Source: Bluet)

Bluet, a sparkling wine made from wild blueberries. (Source: Bluet)

In the New York Times, Eric Asimov profiles Eric Martin and Michael Terrien, who are making sparkling wine from wild blueberries in Maine under the Bluet label—“a beverage that he hopes will be not only a delicious expression of his home state but also an aid to keeping farmers in business… This ray of hope has attracted the attention of the state of Maine, which, in its effort to preserve agricultural traditions, has given Bluet grants and loans.”

In the San Francisco Chronicle, Esther Mobley highlights Sonoma natural winemaker Caleb Leisure, the only winemaker fermenting his wines in bona fide Georgian qveri. “Of course, Leisure would love to work with Georgian grape varieties — but there aren’t any planted in California yet, to his knowledge. He hopes to be able to change that… It would be easy for this sort of Georgian wine emulation to fall into gimmickry, but after spending the morning with Leisure I’m moved by his sense of curiosity — about Georgia, about natural winemaking, and most of all about these big clay vessels he’s got.”

In Wine Enthusiast, Lauren Mowery puts together an all-encompassing wine lover’s guide to Sardinia.

“Remnants of a large, medieval winery believed to date back to the era of the Crusades have been found underneath a house in modern-day Israel,” reports Chris Mercer in Decanter.

In Wine-Searcher, Don Kavanagh looks closely at blind tasting study done for canned wines. “The first issue I had was that the company offering this purportedly independent scientific study was called WIC Research. Now maybe that stands for “What I Call” Research, or “Wichita Ice Cream” Research, but I’m prepared to suggest that it stands for Wine in Can Research. Almost inevitably, it turns out that the company is a wine-in-a-can marketing research and consulting company. I began to catch a faint whiff of bovine waste.”

In the Wall Street Journal, Lettie Teague offers a skeptic’s guide to canned wines. (subscription req.)

In Vinous, Josh Raynolds reports on 2019 rosés.

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