Daily Wine News: Native Grapes in Cincinnati

Posted by | Posted in Wine News | Posted on 08-14-2019

Catawba, a native grape. (Wikimedia)

Catawba, a native grape. (Wikimedia)

In Atlas Obscura, Laima Rastikis profiles winemaker Kate MacDonald, who is working to restore Cincinnati’s place as the birthplace of American wine with heritage grapes. “She believes they may be the wine industry’s salvation in the face of ever-worsening threats from climate change. As conditions and seasons in established growing regions change, so will the viability of existing vines… MacDonald notes that American native grapes are particularly hardy, as they tend to adapt to changing weather patterns and climate extremes.”

­In SevenFifty Daily, Joseph Hernandez looks into the proposed US tariffs on EU goods and how they’ll potentially affect domestic consumers and the wine business.

In Wine Spectator, Robert Camuto pays a visit to Tavel and discovers some inspiring rosés. “Tavel is a different kind of pink. A few shades darker than the white peach or onion skin rosés, it’s past coral and on its way to being red. The wines have grip and body and can be drunk year-round, even benefiting from aging. But today the wines can be hard to find. In the United States, they are a niche product.”

“Amazon rarely does anything quietly, but it turns out that the company has already run a retail wine and spirits “store” in Los Angeles for six months, without anybody noticing,” reports W. Blake Gray in Wine-Searcher.

In Sip Northwest, winemakers and vineyard owners look ahead to the future of Washington wine.

I’ve freed myself from this paradigm, and I invite you to do the same. Go ahead and get the cheapest bottle of wine with a clean conscience,” advises Jaya Saxena in Eater.

In Wine Enthusiast, Michael Schachner dives into the many sides of tempranillo, and recent noteworthy vintages in Spain.

“A lot of energy is spent (and probably wasted) trying to emulate the success of one particular emerging wine region that started to soar more than thirty years ago and hasn’t slowed down since. That region is New Zealand and the key to its take off is widely seen to be its choice of a signature grape variety to rally around — Sauvignon Blanc.” Mike Veseth, the wine economist, ponders the secrets for emerging wine region success.

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